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Lowrie concerned about left arm pain

Lowrie concerned about left arm pain

NEW YORK -- Red Sox shortstop Jed Lowrie did not hide his concern after being forced to leave Thursday night's 13-6 loss to the Yankees with tingling in his left forearm.

Lowrie underwent surgery on his left wrist in April and returned to the Red Sox on July 18. Were the symptoms he had Friday related to the surgery? It is too early to know.

The Red Sox and Lowrie should know more by Friday.

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Where, exactly, did Lowrie feel the discomfort?

"It's along the outside of my wrist, and it kind of goes from the middle of my forearm up to my fingers -- my pinky specifically," Lowrie said.

He felt it during his first at-bat, and again when he struck out in the fourth. He came out of the game in the bottom of the fourth.

"He had some tingling, some numbness in his fourth and fifth fingers," said Red Sox manager Terry Francona. "Again, we all know what he's gone through with his wrist. We're going to have to figure it out, and probably pretty quickly.

"I don't know that it was an absolute that it was his wrist. It was more his forearm. Again, a guy comes out of a game and he's a little tender or had some tingling. I don't know that a trainer can just tell you right now. Again, we'll spend some time tonight trying to see what we need to do with him. That's probably the best I can give you right now."

Lowrie said he experienced similar symptoms during the team's last homestand, when the Red Sox were playing the Oakland Athletics.

The Red Sox are beat up at the moment. Starters Tim Wakefield and Daisuke Matsuzaka are both on the disabled list. Left fielder Jason Bay might miss this entire series against the Yankees with right hamstring woes. And now Lowrie could be out of the mix for a few days.

Lowrie has struggled at the plate this season, perhaps because his wrist is not up to full strength yet. He is hitting .143 with one homer and seven RBIs.

Ian Browne is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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