Napoli joins elite company with massive blast

Slugger becomes just 17th player to hit homer to Rogers Centre's fifth deck

Napoli joins elite company with massive blast

TORONTO -- Mike Napoli's mammoth home run in the 11th inning marked the 17th time in Rogers Centre history that a player has gone deep to the fifth deck.

Napoli crushed a three-run shot from Sergio Santos above the Level of Excellence in extra innings of the Red Sox's 11-7 win on Tuesday, joining Manny Ramirez as the only other Boston player to accomplish the feat.

Ramirez went 491 feet to left field off Chris Carpenter in 2001, hitting the longest home run in the stadium's history.

 

Napoli was quick to brush off the moon shot as just another homer, but he said he was glad to be able to get the team buzzing on the bench.

 

"It's always nice to mess around with your teammates and everyone's just going crazy in the dugout," Napoli said. "But it's just a homer."

Others were slightly more impressed.

"I think that's the third one I've seen to the fifth deck. ... I haven't seen anyone go there on an 0-2 count, so it might be at the top of the list," said manager John Farrell.

Dustin Pedroia said they all count the same, but he admitted that the homer was something else.

"They all count. It doesn't matter how much they go over, but yeah, that was pretty impressive," said Pedroia, who hit a two-run homer in the first.

Napoli's homer effectively put the game out of reach, but not before Allen Craig hit his first long ball as a member of the Red Sox. Craig hit a two-run shot to right field to bury any hopes the Blue Jays had of a comeback.

Still, Craig preferred to talk about Napoli's feat above his own.

"That homer he hit, that was really impressive and huge for our team," said Craig of Napoli's shot. "I've never seen one hit that far in person. I didn't catch much of the buzz on the bench, because I was going up to hit, but I told the guys after that was one of the best I've seen."

As for his own home run?

"It really felt great to get that first one in this uniform," Craig said.

Jamie Ross is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.